Artist In Residence

Somerset based artist Lotte Scott will be spending a week at Clayhill Arts, using the site and its materials as inspiration to create new work, explore alternative ways of working and how best to share her material based practice digitally.

Depending on the restrictions that are in place at the time of residency this will be taking place on site at Clayhill, or at a distance from Lotte’s own studio in Compton Dundon with material sent from Clayhill for exploration.

Aware that the pandemic has halted plans for so many, and that the practice of an artist needs the time, space and support to grow, Clayhill were keen to offer Lotte the opportunity of a residency as her work meets a number of the aspects which Clayhill promotes.

Lotte’s work explores place, time and material and for the last seven years her practice has focused on the peat moors of the Somerset Levels. With an interest in archaeology and local distinctiveness also informs her work and the time at Clayhill during the residency she will be exploring the development of some land based drawings, working with local farmer Fred Price of Gothelney Farm to understand the make-up of the land, the cycle of crops and how the homemade charcoal would enhance or interfere with this process.

We approached Lotte for this residency, after visiting her work A Long Hundred which was created during Somerset Art Weeks Festival in 2019 and later helped to secure her as the recipient of the Gilchrist Fisher award in February 2020. The slow nature of Lotte’s work and its sensitivity to the landscape, fit with Clayhill’s low impact vision and was a natural extension of their offer to work with her on this residency. By providing the time and space for Lotte to reflect on the opportunities opened to her through the Gilchrist Fisher award, but with the lack of being able to do anything with this for some time due to Covid, Clayhill felt it important to mark that time and offer the space in which to explore that.

During the residency week, Lotte will be sharing the development of her work and experiments, whilst getting to know the site at Clayhill and the capabilities available within it. Through previous discussions, it became clear that there is a disconnect for artists at the moment in terms of mediating their practice. By being plunged unwillingly into a digital world, there are lots of questions around what that means for exhibiting work, for having time to consider the material that you work with and how that is translated to an audience if they can’t see it up close, interact with it in a physical space, or in fact touch it if that is what the work is about.

During the upcoming online event, Clayhill Arts will be exploring these themes and Lotte will be contributing to this via a live stream video to discuss the work she has been making and answering questions about what this might mean for the future of her practice – how can digital benefit her work?

Due to deliver the workshop Destructive Distillation: Exploratory Charcoal Making and Drawing, which has now been rescheduled (future date tbc), Lotte will be developing her own charcoal during the time on the residency, using previously felled trees from around the Clayhill site and exploring the suitability of other plants and natural material that are available.

You follow Lotte on Instagram @lottescottartist

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